RANCBA REUNION 2022

Navy’s new Maritime Multi-Cam Pattern Uniform roll-out will commence in October 2021. The new lightweight contemporary uniform utilises the latest technology, enhancing the safety and comfort of members wearing it. Manufactured in Australia, the MMPU has retained its gray tone similar to that of the Disruptive Pattern Navy Uniform (DPNU), but a point of difference are the two variants now available, a flame resistant and non-flame resistant version, depending on the roles of the member. The uniform roll-out has started in the warmer tropical states of the Northern Territory and North Queensland and issued to other units with an expected completion at the end of 2022 Warrant Officer Andrew Lee wears the Royal Australian Navy's new Maritime Multi-Cam Pattern Uniform at HMAS Coonawarra, Darwin, NT.(l-r) Seaman Maritime Personnel Operator Jane Rhodes, Seaman General Experiance Bailey Steenbuck, Midshipman Morgan Schieflebein and Seaman General Experience Gemma Silverstand, outside HMAS Coonawarra Headquarters, Darwin, NT....

Following advice received from Alan (Blue) Higgins Ex Petty Officer   RAN Rtd, R63100. Just like to inform you and your Comms branch members that my brother ex CPORS Murray (Blue) Higgins R93353  crossed the bar in June of this year, He is survived by wife Pat and his 3 children and many grandchildren....

Following received from Andy Cowley (ex LTO)  Ken Seib crossed the bar Saturday 18th September after a long illness. He and his wife were living in Orange NSW. Should anyone wish to contact Ken's wife (ex WRAN) email kpseib@bigpond.com. Phone contact available on request.  ...

ADSO Alliance of Defence Service OrganisationsMEDIA STATEMENT‘CONTESTING’ ANZAC DAYMany parents will undoubtedly know at least something about the Australian CurriculumAssessment and Reporting Authority. It is instituted to ‘….inspire improvement in thelearning of all young Australians through world-class curriculum, assessment and reporting’.But what is ‘world class’ about the Authority looking for a fight?Veterans and many other Australians are curious about why there is now an impetus by theAuthority to question and indeed to transform the way the nation commemorates suchhistorically defining events as ANZAC Day. Why is the Authority seeking to pressurestudents and their teachers to ‘contest’ the notion of ANZAC Day?Authority Chair Belinda Robinson has spoken of “a commitment to, and respect for,knowledge, facts, truth and respect”. Yet the current Draft Curriculum emphasises, indeeddemands, that such defining moments in the nation’s history be “contested”.The words contest, contesting or contested are mentioned numerous times in the draft report.But the words are not defined, nor is there guidance to allow teachers to structure theirlessons accordingly.Is the Curriculum Authority promoting the notion that such defining events as ANZAC Dayand facts around it be disputed? Is the Authority having a bob each way in expressing supportand commitment but then encouraging teachers to dispute the fact and to question thesignificance of ANZAC Day?The group of 18 ex-service Associations that make up the Alliance of Defence ServiceOrganisations (ADSO)1 calls on the Chair of the Curriculum Authority to be upfront withveterans’ and the broad Australian community to explain why the facts around ANZAC Dayand other significant historical events are being disputed.Kel RyanNational ChairmanAlliance of Defence Service OrganisationsPhone: (02) 6265 9530 | Mobile: 0418 759 120PO Box 4166 KINGSTON ACT 2604...

Indo-Pacific Endeavour 21 (IPE21) is Australia’s flagship regional engagement activity, reinforcing Australia’s strong and enduring partnerships in Southeast Asia. Centred on a maritime task group, IPE21 involves HMA Ships Canberra and Anzac and approximately 700 people, including Australian Defence Force and civilian defence personnel, and sea riders from partner nations. Engagements have been modified in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and will be carried out primarily through contactless port visits, and will include a range of virtual workshops and at-sea activities. Able Seaman Communications and Information Systems Liam Hanly signals Royal Malaysian Navy ship KD Lekiu from HMAS Anzac during Indo-Pacific Endeavour 21.Seaman Communications and Information Systems Sean Dunne signals HMAS Canberra from HMAS Anzac during Indo-Pacific Endeavour 21.Seaman Communications Information Systems Travis Mathews on the bridge of HMAS Canberra during activities with the Republic of Singapore Navy on Exercise Indo-Pacific Endeavour 21. Royal Australian Navy ships HMA Canberra and Anzac with Royal Malaysian Navy ships KD Jebat and KD Lekiu, sail in formation during Indo-Pacific Endeavour 2021.HMAS Canberra sails through the Gulf of Thailand to take part in regional engagement activity as part of Indo-Pacific Endeavour 21.Singaporean CH-47 Chinook conducts deck landing exercises during an interoperability capability demonstration on board HMAS Canberra during Indo-Pacific Endeavour 21....

31 Aug 2021 11:23 AM AEST - MEDIA RELEASE - THE HON ANDREW GEE - Honouring our veterans who served in Malaya and Borneo   The Hon Andrew Gee MP Minister for Veterans’ Affairs Minister for Defence Personnel Federal Member for Calare   MEDIA RELEASE 31 August 2021 HONOURING OUR VETERANS WHO SERVED IN MALAYA AND BORNEO   Today is Malaya and Borneo Veterans’ Day, when we pause to recognise and remember the 10,500 Australians who served in the Malayan Emergency and the Indonesian Confrontation. Minister for Veterans’ Affairs and Defence Personnel Andrew Gee said he encourages Australians to acknowledge the service and dedication of those who fought in these post-Second World War conflicts in the Malaya and Borneo regions. “Only a few short years following the end of the Second World War, the Malayan Emergency began in 1948, lasting until 1960,” Minister Gee said. “The Malayan Emergency was declared following the murder of three European estate managers who were killed as part of the Malayan Communist Party’s insurgency against the British colonial government. Australia’s military involvement commenced in 1950 and continued with anti-insurgency operations in Malaya until 1963.” One key success of the conflict was a coordinated operation in July 1954 in Perak state. In an operation code named Termite, five RAAF Lincoln bombers and another six Lincolns from 148 RAF Squadron made simultaneous attacks on two communist camps. This was followed by drops of British paratroops, a ground attack, and a further bombing run ten days later. The mission destroyed a large number of guerrilla camps. During 13 years in Malaya, personnel from the Royal Australian Navy, Australian Army and the Royal Australian Air Force played an important role in bringing the long-running communist insurgency in the region to an end. The Indonesian Confrontation or Konfrontasi started in 1962, ending in 1966.  This conflict was a small undeclared war fought between Indonesia and the newly federated state of Malaysia. “The Confrontation was a dispute over whether the former British colonies of Sabah and Sarawak which bordered Indonesian provinces on Borneo, would become part of Indonesia or of the newly federated Malaysia,” Minister Gee said. “In 1964 Australian, New Zealand and British troops first became involved in the conflict. “On 11 August 1966 Indonesia signed a peace treaty with Malaysia. The treaty recognised that the North Borneo states of Sabah and Sarawak would continue to be part of the Malaysian Federation. “This year marks 55 years since the end of the Confrontation and I urge all Australians to pause and remember the service and sacrifice of those who fought for our nation. “Tragically, we lost 39 Australians during the Malayan Emergency, and 23 military personnel during the Indonesian Confrontation. Australia will never forget them and all who served in those conflicts. They made a vitally important contribution to restoring peace and security to our region.” You can learn more about the Malayan Emergency and Indonesian Confrontation on the Department of Veterans’ Affairs Anzac Portal.     ...

Sydney Harbour will retain the naval presence its had since the First Fleet and “the days of the sail” with Defence formally scotching a public push for them to surrender Garden Island and shift elsewhere along the east coast.NSW is also poised to have a submarines berth for the first time in more than 20 years to strategically boost defences of the most populous side of the nation, with Garden Island at its centre.After countless reviews since the 1960s through to today, Defence has formally ruled “there’s no feasible economic east coast location for the total replacement of the capabilities that are provided at Garden Island”.  Sub Lieutenant Jaycob Humphreys looks out from the quarterdeck of HMAS Canberra as it departs Fleet Base East, in Sydney for a four-month deployment including Talisman Sabre 2021. Picture: DefenceInvestment in the base has concluded it “will remain viable as the sustainment and home port for our east coast major fleet units” well into the future.The only remaining consideration being the continued push back from residents of Potts Point, Woolloomooloo and Kings Cross whose complaints have already forced the Royal Australian Navy to alter its operations. HMAS Hobart leads HMA Ships Stuart and Parramatta out of Sydney Harbour for their Maritime East Asia Deployment. Picture: DefenceThere had been government lobbying from some quarters for Garden Island to be part-surrendered to the leisure cruise-ship industry to boost tourism and economy but that notion did not fit with the bigger picture to have a submarine base on the east coast with resources already in Sydney Harbour at its core.The Federal Government has yet to make an announcement about submarines, which are currently all based in Western Australia, but sources confirmed internal Defence analyses showed a need for a two-ocean basing of a future submarine fleet with a presence on the east coast, at its own base anticipated to be in NSW. Seaman Maritime Logistics Steward Zachary Stokes kisses his fiance Chloie Osborne goodbye on the wharf at Fleet Base East, Sydney. Picture: DefenceThat review also found personnel hiring and retention for the armed forces would benefit if part of the sub fleet were based in Sydney.Defence has been reviewing the push since 2017 when internal polling found Navy was haemorrhaging staff in part due to familial separation with the majority of sub crews hired from the east but based in the west.The submariner ranks have to swell from current 852 personnel to more than 2000 to accommodate the new fleet of French-designed Barracuda sometime in the next decade and maintain a sea-shore capability. Australian Army soldiers from the Australian Defence Force contingent rehearse at Randwick Barracks. Picture: DefenceThere are already plans for infrastructure developments at Garden Island and the RAN in NSW, including 900 new accommodation units potentially to be constructed at Randwick Barracks.Navy Future Infrastructure chief Rear Admiral Philip Spedding described Garden Island as an enduring base “since the days of the sail” that remained viable.“It does, of course, suffer from urban encroachment, so we have to change some of our practices, and we have done so, to be able to accommodate the demands and needs of the resident population nearby, but it is still a viable site for the Navy going forward,” he told a defence committee reviewing infrastructure. HMAS Brisbane departs Fleet Base East in Sydney, New South Wales for Exercise Talisman Sabre 2021. Picture: DefenceHe described Garden Island and the Sydney basin defence precinct including HMAS Penguin, HMAS Watson, HMAS Waterhen and Randwick Barracks, Chowder Bay fuel storage and Sydney Fleet HQ as an interlocked system.“If you think about moving individual elements out of Sydney, you dislocate the system and introduce inefficiencies and additional costs,” he said. “At the moment, our intention is to remain based on the east coast in Sydney, but, as I said, we balance it up between the west coast and the east coast. If the government, on recommendation, were to accept an east coast submarine base, then you might look at what other capabilities it would be sensible to co-locate in that location, but that advice has not yet been provided to government.” Garden Island, Fleet Base East, Sydney.A defence spokeswoman said yesterday Garden Island upgrades, including a 372m long wharf, were designed to minimise disruption to local residents and Navy had restricted activities which generated noise to “less sensitive times”.“Additionally, recent upgrades to infrastructure at the base will help reduce noise, pollution and ensure ship maintenance is further away from residential areas,” the spokeswoman said....